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13/09/2013

you can'st do a complete OBD II Scanner test unless all of the monitors are ready

If the downstream O2 sensor reading is fluctuating from high to low like the front sensor, it means the converter is not functioning. The Check Engine light will come on if the difference in O2 sensor readings indicates hydrocarbon (HC) readings have increased to a level that is 1.5 times the federal limit. For 1996 and newer vehicles that meet federal Low Emission Vehicles (LEV) requirements, the limit allows only 0.225 grams per mile (gpm) of HC - which is almost nothing. Converter efficiency drops from 99 percent when it is new to around 96 percent after a few thousand miles. After that, any further drop in efficiency may be enough to turn on the Check Engine light. We'sre talking about a very sensitive diagnostic monitor.


The EVAP system monitor checks for fuel vapor leaks by performing either a pressure or vacuum test on the fuel system. For 1996 through 1999 vehicles, the federal standard allows leaks up to the equivalent of a hole .040 inches in diameter in a fuel vapor hose or filler cap. For 2000 and newer vehicles, the leakage rate has been reduced to the equivalent of a .020 in. diameter hole, which is almost invisible to the naked eye but can be detected by the Car Diagnostic Tool system. Finding these kinds of leaks can be very challenging.

An essential part of the OBD II system are the "readiness flags" that indicate when a particular monitor is active and has taken a look at the system it is supposed to keep watch over. The misfire detection, fuel system and continuous system monitors are active and ready all the time, but the non-continuous monitors require a certain series of operating conditions before they will set - and you can'st do a complete OBD II Scanner test unless all of the monitors are ready.